INDIGENOUS FOOD SOVEREIGNTY

  • CELEBRATING COMMUNITY FOOD ACTION WITH MOUNT PLEASANT FOOD NETWORK

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Advocacy, Community Gardening and Urban Farming, Dignified Food Access, Food Justice, Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Job Opportunities, Mount Pleasant Food Network, Neighbourhood Food Networks, Poverty Reduction // September 15, 2020

    This is the eighth in a series of blog posts featuring each of our Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Networks.


    The Mount Pleasant Food Network (MPFN) is dedicated to supporting the health and well-being of all residents living in Mount Pleasant and nearby neighbourhoods by promoting an accessible, just and sustainable food system for our community. Administered by Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House, this Network plays an important role in community development especially relating to food security and food justice issues.

    A summertime image of the Queen Alexandra School garden

    The Mount Food Network has a focus on building value in the food justice movement and supporting the work of individuals and groups who are experts in this field. Over the past seven years, outgoing Network Coordinator and Indigenous community developer and planner Jolene Andrew (Git’xsan, Wit’suwet’in) has been an advisor on Indigenous food sovereignty issues.  

    Currently the network is seeking a new Network Coordinator (part-time) to continue Jolene’s wonderful work and bring new energy and ideas to the network. Please inquire at info@mpnh.org.

    The Network’s activities typically include Indigenous land sovereignty advocacy and action through the Queen Alexandra Elementary School garden, and the Resurfacing History Project, hosted by Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House. The school garden has been part of the Indigenous Foodscapes project by FarmToSchool BC and the Vancouver School Board, and seed saving practices are taught for food system resiliency. 

    Before COVID, Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House and the Food Network served weekly community meals and frequently hosted cooking and nutrition workshops for participants of all ages. Food recovery and distribution has been one of many supports offered to low-income participants. 

    An image of someone's hands touching the leaves of a plant

    Since COVID, many activities have shifted to an online format. The Food Network Coordinator participates in many groups and committees, with a COVID response lens from the Mount Pleasant neighbourhood view. This includes Climate Equity at the City of Vancouver and the Food Policy Council. 

    Some of the typical Neighbourhood House programming has shifted toward online cooking workshops, including a monthly youth cooking club using Zoom. While the Mount Pleasant Food Network typically gathers with many community organizations, the pandemic has prevented a gathering of the full network, but outdoor activities at the garden have continued. 

    Direct services have been shifted toward emergency food response, and supplying take-home meals and food boxes to seniors. 

    An image of people harvesting garlic in the fall

    Goals

    In the autumn of 2019, the Mount Pleasant Food Network was able to have some planning done to inform the future and ongoing work priorities, although these plans have been put on pause. The Food Network’s priorities are to work on communication to grow the network, and focus on collaboration and connecting across networks to support new and developing initiatives. They would also like to directly support some initiatives like starting new projects.  

    In order to build capacity across the Network, and to share the work and draw on additional resources, the Mount Pleasant Food Network is moving toward a cohesive and collaborative inter-agency approach to supporting its activities.

    Learn more, contribute and celebrate community food action with Mount Pleasant Food Network:

  • CELEBRATING COMMUNITY FOOD ACTION WITH STRATHCONA COMMUNITY CENTRE FOOD SECURITY PROGRAM

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Advocacy, Community Gardening and Urban Farming, Dignified Food Access, Food Justice, Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Neighbourhood Food Networks, News, Poverty Reduction, Strathcona Community Centre // September 3, 2020

    This is the sixth in a series of blog posts featuring each of our Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Networks.


    Khalid Jamal (he, him, his) has been the Food Network Coordinator for the Strathcona Community Centre Food Security Program for about a year. His own early memories of food inform his passion for feeding the neighbourhood.

    “My mum had a big wooden spoon that she would only use when making big meals. To me, that spoon represents love.”

    An image of a wooden spoon with a heart carved into the centre

    The Strathcona Community Centre has been known as a place where the community can meet, share thoughts, explore new and different avenues of recreation, socialize and become involved. Being located in the midst of a unique, warm, and friendly multi-cultural community, the centre attempts to fulfill the many different needs. The centre is a resource which can be drawn upon by all groups and persons for information, ideas and resources. 

    Before COVID-19, its doors were always open to all those wishing to use it. The closure of Strathcona Community Centre during the pandemic led the Network to step up and provide emergency food response. Their weekly backpack program has adapted and expanded to become the Strathcona Emergency Food Hub, where food hampers are distributed each week.

    An image of Strathcona Community Centre

    Before the pandemic, this neighbourhood food Network engaged community members in gardening and urban farming, including workshops for community education and seed-saving as a tool for resilience by making well-adapted varieties of plants available for future gardening seasons. Community meals and workshops for nutrition and cooking were also popular activities for this neighbourhood food network, which participates in food recovery and distribution.

    Khalid mentions that several of the residents living near the space they are distributing food from are really skilled gardeners. “As a group, they’re very diverse in language, culture, age, and physical ability, and they manage to have gardening as their meeting place,” Khalid says. “They connect to share garden tips, seedlings, and soil, intuitively supporting each other as neighbours. While food security, mental health and social isolation are challenges in Strathcona during the pandemic, this group seems to have found a way to cope.”

    An image of cardboard boxes filled with carrots, celery, lettuce and other fresh veggies

    Needs and Goals

    Khalid and his colleagues recognize community needs for social connection as being integral to food security work. Strathcona’s food programs  aim to meet these needs by offering food skills programs, especially for children and seniors, land-based learning, and cultural programming.

    The network’s future goals include more cultural programming, especially for Indigenous and newcomer communities, and stronger collaboration with neighbourhood partners.

    Learn more, contribute, and celebrate community food action with Strathcona Community Centre Food Security Program:

    An image of many cardboard boxes filled with fresh green veggies
  • CELEBRATING COMMUNITY FOOD ACTION WITH GRANDVIEW WOODLAND FOOD CONNECTION

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Advocacy, Community Gardening and Urban Farming, Dignified Food Access, Food Justice, Grandview Woodland Food Connection, Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Neighbourhood Food Networks, News, Poverty Reduction // August 6, 2020

    This is the third in a series of blog posts featuring each of our Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Networks.


    Ian Marcuse (he, him, his) has been the food network coordinator for the Grandview Woodland Food Connection for 12 years. He is a Jewish/English cis male, born in Vancouver and raised in Calgary. At 59 years old, Ian identifies as “almost an early senior.” He has lived in the Grandview-Woodland community for 33 years

    The Grandview Woodland Food Connection is dedicated to supporting the wellbeing of all residents living in Grandview Woodland by promoting an accessible, just and sustainable food system for the community. As a network, they seek to build capacity through education, information-sharing, and the creation of grassroots initiatives to address food security and justice issues.

    The network has a strong school food garden program, due to the proximity of schools where they work. They have the longest-running coordinator of any Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Network, and they are a union site. They have a wide breadth of community food security programming, including a strong Indigenous focus to their work, and are working toward an even-stronger Indigenous food framework in their programming.

    An image of Indigenous herbalist Lori Snyder teaching a group of people in the garden

    For Ian, respect and gratitude toward all the people he works with is paramount, especially with acknowledgment and redress to First Nations. He collaboratatively practices a decolonization and a land-based approach to food security, as well as place-based thinking, while upholding a strong networked model of organizing.

    Ian appreciates meaningful collaborations, including a strong and active advisory committee and support from Britannia Community Services Society as the network’s host agency. The Grandview Woodland Food Connection practices strong coalition-building and positive relationships with the Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Networks, the City of Vancouver and other government institutions.

    Ian came to this work, perhaps in spite of his own personal history of growing up with a lot of processed foods. “That was the 70’s and the health awareness was not as sophisticated back then. There was no organic food movement,” he says. “I am now fairly addicted to sugar and my guilty pleasure is Dairy Queen burgers. On the other hand, my mom was a good cook and so we did eat regular home-cooked meals.”

    “Every Sunday was a full sit-down family dinner, usually with something more fancy, such as a roast beef—I think my father’s favourite, along with my mother’s delicious piroshkis,” Ian recalls.

    “We also grew up with a small veggie garden, which I spent much time tending, so I developed a fairly decent green thumb at an early age.”

    An image of Ian raking the garden, with a big grin on his face

    Business-as-usual for the Grandview Woodland Food Connection involves a whole host of food security activities, including school gardening, food celebrations like the iconic Stone Soup Festival, the Corn Festival, and other special events where meals are provided, along with networking and information-sharing.

    Ian points out that COVID-19 has the network mainly focusing on emergency food provision. The closest program prior was the bulk food program, which was a wholesale food group purchasing program—also known as a good food box program. Ian likes to think of it more as a co-op model, where participants pay a minimal fee to purchase food.

    A banner showing several images of people growing and preparing food together

    Different from a food bank, the bulk food program is affordable and includes a more dignified system of reciprocity, preventing a sense of stigma. As a result, the network developed experience with bulk food procurement, sorting and distribution, which meant they were more prepared for COVID-19 emergency food delivery, with a heavy focus on food procurement. Having pre-existing relationships with businesses allowed them to purchase food at cost. The network’s well-established volunteer base and Britannia’s volunteer programmer helped them quickly implement the emergency food distribution program.

    Ian talks about how people in the community have really stepped up to help with food delivery, whether it be the very generous donations received through a gofundme campaign, along with other donations and the 126 volunteers who have committed time to date. People in the Grandview-Woodland community truly care, which for Ian is the most heartwarming aspect of this work.

    Another important story is that none of this effort, and none of this work just magically happened. It is the culmination of decades of community development work, of strong volunteer engagement, of building and fostering strong relations with partner organizations, businesses, funders, and community members. Most importantly, it is the local community organizations, working from a social development and place-based model that have fostered a culture of connection, caring and resilience that has allowed the network to successfully respond to this pandemic. It did not happen in a vacuum.

    “While we only hear snippets of people’s lives through brief telephone conversations—including many stories of pain and physical suffering from poor health and aging,” Ian says, “we are reminded how difficult these times are for many people.” For Ian, COVID-19 has magnified the underlying complexities and systemic exclusion of the most vulnerable in the community, many of whom are struggling—financially, emotionally, physically and spiritually.”

    “This pandemic has not affected us equitably,” Ian says. “Indigenous, Black, people of colour, women, young workers, trans people, folks with disabilities, and the elderly are more likely to be grappling with poverty, prejudice, stress and systemic discrimination.”

    “But despite all this struggle so many people are letting us know how grateful they are for the food support that they are receiving. Our drivers always tell us how grateful people are when the food is dropped off.”

    Ian Marcuse, Grandview Woodland Food Connection
    An indoor image of person wearing a mask while filling boxes of food

    Challenges & Goals

    Some of the network’s future goals include establishing a neighbourhood-based/scale food hub with direct farm and inner city food distribution linkages. They would like to increase food storage capacity for quality food, like fresh produce. They have also recently become a United Way Local Love Food Hub.

    Ian’s vision includes increasing community organizing and advocacy capacity, with a systems change focus. Ideally, they would like to hire a permanent school gardener programmer to coordinate and expand food growing and educational opportunities with school partners.

    Learn more about Grandview-Woodland Food Connection, get involved, and celebrate community food action:

    Read more about Grandview-Woodland’s emergency food response, community partner and funders, and other initiatives

  • FOOD JUSTICE REQUIRES RACIAL JUSTICE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Advocacy, Cedar Cottage Food Network, Dignified Food Access, Downtown Eastside Kitchen Tables, Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House, Food Justice, Gordon Neighbourhood House, Grandview Woodland Food Connection, Hastings Sunrise Community Food Network, Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Little Mountain Riley Park Neighbourhood House, Marpole Oakridge Neighbourhood Food Network, Migrant Justice, Mount Pleasant Food Network, Neighbourhood Food Networks, Poverty Reduction, Renfrew Collingwood Food Justice, South Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Network, Strathcona Community Centre, Village Vancouver, West End Neighbourhood Food Network, Westside Food Collaborative // June 5, 2020

    The Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Networks’ ongoing commitment to food justice and food sovereignty means committing to racial justice.

    We stand in solidarity with Black, Indigenous, and Racialized Peoples.

  • PHOTOS: WILD SALMON CARAVAN 2018

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Food Justice, Gordon Neighbourhood House, Grandview Woodland Food Connection, Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Strathcona Community Centre // October 5, 2018

    Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Networks participated in this year’s Wild Salmon Caravan parade on Saturday, September 22, 2018.

    This is an annual event organized by the Working Group for Indigenous Food Sovereignty in partnership with over 100 local organizations from Vancouver through Chase, B.C. It is also the kick off event for Sustenance Festival, a local community-based food, art, and culture festival.

    Photo by Gary Haggquist, Wild Salmon Caravan

    The Wild Salmon Caravan festivities began in downtown Vancouver, or what is known as Xwenelmexw on unceded Coast Salish territories.

    The Wild Salmon Caravan Parade

    Hundreds of people gathered in the streets to celebrate the beauty and resilience of wild salmon as an Indigenous food source, and a significant cultural and ecological keystone species.

    Chants of “Wild Salmon Forever!” were accompanied by colourful costumes, mermaid tails, mythical sea creatures, parade floats, bike floats, banners, and artful decor with an homage to wild salmon.

    Photo by Murray Bush, Wild Salmon Caravan

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  • WILD SALMON CARAVAN PARADE KICKS OFF

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Events, Food Justice, Indigenous Food Sovereignty // September 17, 2018

    The fourth annual Wild Salmon Caravan Parade is happening in Vancouver this weekend. You’re invited to join in the celebration!


    Wild Salmon Caravan is an annual celebration that celebrates wild salmon and follows  their journey as they migrate from the Salish Sea to the Adams River in Chase, BC.

    The Wild Salmon Caravan parade and ceremony begins in downtown Vancouver. This celebrations will be led by Indigenous Matriarchs and traditional hand drummers and singers from diverse cultural groups. The parade will feature artistic floats, elaborate regalia, costumes, and banners. A full program of performances and speakers will follow with an exhibit of salmon leather making. (more…)

  • WILD SALMON CARAVAN – VANCOUVER PARADE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Advocacy, Events, Indigenous Food Sovereignty // October 12, 2017

    In case you missed it, check out the spectacular photos of the Wild Salmon Caravan parade from Saturday, October 7, 2017.

    Drumming, regalia, costumes, floats, signs, banners and more all express our love for, celebration of, and deep concern to protect Wild Salmon. Led by Salish Matriarchs, the parade started at the Native Friendship Centre and walked up Commercial Drive to Trout lake where a salmon ceremony was held at the lake then followed by an amazing salmon feast, speakers, and performances.

    This initiative was supported by our Vancouver Neighbourhood Food Networks, including Grandview Woodlands Food Connection, Cedar Cottage Food Network, and Little Mountain-Riley Park Food Network.

    All photos by Murray Rankin. Read the full blog post on the Grandview Woodlands Food Connection blog.

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